IS HIGH-FIDELITY PATIENT SIMULATION-BASED TEACHING SUPERIOR TO VIDEO-ASSISTED LECTUREBASED TEACHING IN ENHANCING KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS AMONG UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL STUDENTS?

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Bikramjit Pal
Sook Vui Chong
Aung Win Thein
Ava Gwak Mui Tay
Htoo Htoo Kyaw Soe
Sudipta Pal

Abstract

Introduction: Medical simulation is a technique that allows interactive and immersive activity by recreating all or part of a clinical experience without exposing the patients to the antecedent risks. High-fidelity patient simulation-based teaching is an innovative and efficient method to address increasing student enrolment, faculty shortages and restricted clinical sites.


Objective: To assess the effectiveness of high-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) as compared to video-assisted lecture-based teaching method (VALB) among undergraduate medical students.


Methods: The study was a Randomized Controlled Trial which involved 56 final year undergraduate medical students. The effectiveness of teaching based on HFPS (intervention group) and VALB (control group), on acquisition of knowledge, was assessed by multiple choice questions (MCQs) in the first and fourth week. Similarly, the skills competency was assessed by objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in the second and fourth week. Mean and standard deviation (SD) for total score of knowledge and skills assessments were used as outcome measures. P value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.


Results: In both groups, students had significant higher mean MCQ scores at Post-tests. The intervention group had higher mean change score of MCQ marks than the control group but the difference was not statistically significant. In both the first and second skills assessments, mean OSCE scores for intervention group were higher than control group but this difference was not statistically significant.


Conclusion: There was significant gain in knowledge in both methods of teaching but did not reach statistical difference in terms of skills enhancement in the intervention group as compared to the control group.

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